How to Upgrade Avionics For Less than $2k Using the Yoke!

    Nothing beats situational awareness via a moving Nav chart combined with GPS. This is my ’62 M20C. Garmin 296 on left (about $600 on eBay) and Ipad on right, (about $900). Plus, don’t forget, with the 296, you get a back up 6-pack. Also, flight planning is cut to seconds with ForeFlight. This is the easiest way to upgrade your birds avionics. Get in-flight weather with Stratus receiver for $799, which is optional. Currently, I still call in for weather briefings from Flight Watch (free). …

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    How To Land a Mooney Properly

    This article is not so much for the veteran Mooney driver, but for those transitioning to the Mooney from the trainers.

    DOES THE MOONEY FLOAT? Yes and No.

    If you’re coming in too fast, you will not only pass the airport on flare, but you’ll pass the city! :o)

    EVERY AIRCRAFT should be flown by the NUMBERS, but especially an airplane as aerodynamically clean and one that has the greatest power off glide ratio in the business and in some instances, more than double the glide of others in its class. As you probably know, EVERYTHING in aviation is a trade-off.…

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    Classic Mooney Ranger Ad

    I purchased this early Mooney ad from eBay recently. Named after the historical Texas Rangers, it appeals to a pilots love for adventure and self-reliance. No doubt, that’s what private aviation is all about. But it comes at the cost of practice, safety and knowledge. As Zef used to say, “never stop learning!” Use our free checklists and get our free download, “10 Questions Every Pilot Should Ask Before Buying a Plane.” …

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    Mooney 252 – “The Mooney with Magic”

    This early ad highlights “The Magic.”

    Zef used to tell me that the 252 was magic, a plane that could never be duplicated in speed, efficiency and reliability. I can’t wait to fly one!

    Plane and Pilot magazine published one pilots real world experience. He said, “I usually fly it around 180 knots down low and between 200 and 210 knots at 17,500 feet. I never fly it wide open. Mostly, I like 65%—that gives me a fuel burn of 12.4 to 12.7 gph. Pretty close to book. See what I mean? Show me another airplane that can do that.”…

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